How to write test cases for radio button article image

How to write test cases for radio button?

When writing test cases for radio buttons, it is important to consider all possible options and how they may affect the functionality of the button. If you want to know more about how to write test cases for the radio button, this is the right guide for you. Follow along with this how-to and finish your application’s first test case by creating your account in our free test case management tool.

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Radio Button Definition and Uses 

A radio button is a graphical control element that allows the user to choose one option from a set of options. Radio buttons are typically presented in groups of two or more, with each button representing a different option. In contrast to checkboxes, where you can enter information with more than one option, radio buttons do not allow you to enter multiple choices at once. 

Depending on how the user chooses to input information, radio button inputs are extremely useful in situations where accuracy is crucial, such as medical records or voting booths. Because radio buttons are important to be error-free, you must know how to write test cases before they go live on your website or application. 

How to write Test Cases for Radio Button- Template  

When writing test cases for radio buttons, consider all the different ways users could interact with the buttons. Test cases should be written with edge cases and potential failure areas. This includes testing how the buttons work when they are selected and unselected, how they work in different browsers, and how they work when disabled or in a hover state. 
Importantly, ensure that the radio button(s) function accurately and seamlessly as part of the larger user interface. 

By thinking about all these potential areas of failure, you can be sure that your test cases are comprehensive and will help to ensure a smooth user experience. 

Two key aspects to testing a button:

There are two key aspects to testing a button: how it looks and behaves. 


To test how a button looks, you will want to check the button’s size, shape, color, and text. Check that the button looks as it should and is easy to see and click. You will also want to check how the button looks in different browsers and devices. 
To test how a button behaves, you will want to check that it performs the correct action when clicked. You will also want to check that the button is disabled when it is supposed to be and is only clickable when it is supposed to be. Finally, you should check that clicking the button does not cause unexpected side effects. 
 

As you can see, testing a button involves verifying its appearance and behavior. By writing test cases for buttons, you can ensure that your users have a positive experience with your software. 

Test Cases for Radio Button 

In writing test cases for radio button, you need to:

Check if the design presents the radio button on the page.
Check the size of the radio button should be the same as the design. 
Check whether the radio buttons have the same style and color as the requirements. 
Check that the label text for the radio button is in the same sequence as specified. 
Check the spelling of the label text with the radio buttons is correct or not. 
Check whether the radio buttons are selectable or unselectable.
Check the radio button shape matches the SRS document. 
Check if the radio button is selectable by using the tab on the keyboard. 
Check the alignment of the radio button on the page. 
Check if the user can select multiple radio buttons. 
Check whether an alert message displays if the user clicks submit without selecting any radio buttons. 
Check redirects to a specific page by clicking the ‘Yes’ radio button control.
Check redirects to a specific page by clicking the ‘No’ radio button control. 
More generally, verify any downstream effects of selecting a radio button control are triggered.
Check if the user selected ‘yes’ in the database. Then the correct information should be saved. 
Check by clicking the label and check whether the radio button is selected or not. 
Check radio button selection on respective web element (text box, drop-down, etc.) open or not. 
Check the alignment of the radio button and label text in all browsers. 
Check how the radio button looks when it is disabled and enabled.
Check how the radio button looks when it is in a hover state. 
Check how the radio button looked after selecting it. 

6 negative test scenarios for a radio button on a page  

  • Clicking on the radio button does not select it. 
  • Clicking on the label for the radio button does not select it. 
  • Pressing the spacebar does not select the radio button. 
  • Continuing the next step without choosing the radio button. 
  • Trying to select multiple radio buttons in a group. 
  • A required radio button is not selected before submitting a form. 

Similar Test Cases

Test Case for:

Resetting Password 
Login Form
Register Box 
Search Button 
Reset Button
Logout Functionality 

 

Related Questions

What is a good test case? 

A good test case covers all the functionality of the feature being tested and is written clearly and concisely. It is thorough and covers all potential areas of failure. It should also be easy to understand and execute and provide clear pass/fail criteria.

How do you write a test case for links? 

Internal and external links are the two types of links that can be found on web pages. Internal Links show how far a user has traveled on your website. In contrast, External Links point to another site or document within an app’s framework (for example). 

When testing links, you will want to click on each link and check that it takes you to the correct destination. You will also want to check that the anchor text and title attribute are accurate. The target attribute should be checked to ensure the link opens in the correct window or tab. Lastly, the link’s context should be checked to ensure it is relevant. 

Conclusion  

Radio buttons are a great way to allow users choice from limited options. Testing your application and ensuring it works as expected will ensure that all user input is handled correctly, resulting in an improved user experience. 

AccelaTest is a free test case management tool packed with features that most other testing tools charge a lot of money for. Get your free account now and create your Radio Button Tests today.

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